01
June
Birth in Four Cultures: A Crosscultural Investigation of Childbirth in Yucatan, Holland, Sweden, and the United States - Brigitte JordanWhile the process of childbirth is, in some sense, everywhere the same, it is also everywhere different in that each culture has produced a birthing system that is strikingly dissimilar from the others. Based on her fieldwork in the United States, Sweden, Holland, and Yucatan, Jordan develops a framework for the discussion and investigation of different birthing systems. Illustrated with useful examples and lively anecdotes from Jordan's own fieldwork, the Fourth Edition of this innovative comparative ethnography brings the reader to a deeper understanding of childbirth as a culturally grounded,
01
June
Modernism, History and the First World War - Trudi TateThis is a study of the relationships between modernist fiction, the First World War, and cultural history. How did modernist writers bear witness to the trauma of the war? Drawing upon medical journals, newspapers, propaganda, military histories, and other writings of the day, Modernism, History, and the First World War reads well-known writers such as Woolf, HD, Ford, Faulkner, Kipling, and Lawrence alongside fiction and memoirs of soldiers and nurses who served in the war. Reading these works together, Tate argues that the critical distinction between "modernism" and "war writing" begins to
01
June
Learning and Memory: Basic Principles, Processes, and Procedures - W. Scott TerryThis comprehensive book covers the core principles of learning and memory in a clear, reader-friendly style.Chapter coverage is divided between animal learning and human memory. To provide balance, human examples have been added to the animal chapters and vice versa. Overall, this is an excellent book with wide-ranging references pulled from varied fields relevant to psychology.
01
June
Redemption in Indigo - Karen LordKaren Lord’s debut novel is an intricately woven tale of adventure, magic, and the power of the human spirit. Paama’s husband is a fool and a glutton. Bad enough that he followed her to her parents’ home in the village of Makendha—now he’s disgraced himself by murdering livestock and stealing corn. When Paama leaves him for good, she attracts the attention of the undying ones—the djombi— who present her with a gift: the Chaos Stick, which allows her to manipulate the subtle forces of the world. Unfortunately, a wrathful djombi with indigo skin believes this power should be his and his alone.