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February
The End of Print: The Graphic Design of David Carson - Lewis Blackwell, David CarsonHe was the enfant terrible of graphic design in the nineties. His tortured typography prompted a vocal camp of critics to accuse him of being flippant and of destroying the communicative basis of design. But now the techniques of David Carson (and those of his countless imitators) dominate advertising, design, the Web, and even motion pictures. With 35,000 copies of the original sold, this revised edition of The End of Print includes a striking new cover and first chapter that puts Carson's work in context. The rest is vintage Carson—cutting edge and explosive. The End of Print tracks his career
13
February
Infoculture: the Smithsonian book of information age inventions - Steven D. LubarLubar unfolds the origins, development, and receptions of such ubiquitous popular technologies as the telephone, television, fax, and computers, showing us how they work, how they are used, and how they have changed--and continue to change--our lives. Photos and illustrations throughout.
13
February
Living with Art - Rita GilbertDesigned for introduction to art courses, this text covers art history and looks at art from the oldest cultures and from around the world.
13
February
Americanos: Latin America's Struggle for Independence - John Charles ChasteenIn this history of the Latin American wars of independence, John Charles Chasteen introduces the reader to lead players, basic concepts, key events, and dominant trends, woven together in a single narrative. He also examines the troubled political legacies of today's Latin American republics.
13
February
Music in the Western World: A History in Documents - Piero Weiss, Richard TaruskinThis classic anthology assembles over 200 source readings, bringing to life the history of music through letters, reviews, biographical sketches, memoirs, and other documents. Writings by composers, critics, and educators touch on virtually every aspect of Western music from ancient Greece to the present day.
13
February
The Worlds of Japanese Popular Culture: Gender, Shifting Boundaries and Global Cultures - D.P. MartinezThis is a lively discussion of Japanese popular culture from an anthropological perspective. An international team of authors considers a broad range of topics, including sumo, karaoke, manga, women's magazines, soccer and morning television. Through these topics--many of which have never previously been addressed by scholars--the contributors also explore several deeper themes: the construction of gender in Japan; the impact of globalisation and modern consumerism; and the rapidly shifting boundaries of Japanese culture and identity.
13
February
The Dobe Ju/'Hoansi - Richard B. LeeThis classic, bestselling study of the !Kung San, foragers of the Dobe area of the Kalahari Desert describes a people's reactions to the forces of modernization, detailing relatively recent changes to !Kung rituals, beliefs, social structure, marriage and kinship system. It documents their determination to take hold of their own destiny-despite exploitation of their habitat and relentless development-to assert their political rights and revitalize their communities. Use of the name Ju/'hoansi (meaning "real people") acknowledges their new sense of empowerment.
13
February
The Gift of the Magi - O. Henry, Lisbeth ZwergerOne dollar and eight-seven cents is all the money Della has in the world to buy her beloved husband a Christmas present. She has nothing to sell except her only treasure -- her long, beautiful brown hair. Set in New York at the turn of the twentieth century, this classic piece of American literature tells the story of a young couple and the sacrifices each must make to buy the other a gift. Beautiful, delicate watercolors by award-winning illustrator Lisbeth Zwerger add new poignancy and charm to this simple tale about the rewards of unselfish love.
13
February
The Difficult Doctrine of the Love of God - D.A. CarsonAt first thought, understanding the doctrine of the love of God seems simple compared to trying to fathom other doctrines like that of the Trinity or predestination. Especially since the overwhelming majority of those who believe in God view Him as a loving being.That is precisely what makes this doctrine so difficult. The only aspect of God's character the world still believes in is His love. His holiness, His sovereignty, His wrath are often rejected as being incompatible with a "loving" God. Because pop culture has so distorted and secularized God's love, many Christians have lost a biblical